No more half measures, Walter.
The 88 - At Least It Was Here
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At Least It Was Here - The 88
I can’t count the reasons I should stay
One by one they all just fade away
Oh, I love you more than words can say

youthagainstfascism:

quentin tarantinos entire wardrobe can be described as “suspicious jogger”

allthingseurope:

Bavarian Alps, Germany (by Dennis_F)

allthingseurope:

Bavarian Alps, Germany (by Dennis_F)

bendydicks:

I am very serious about everything and I am holding puppies

breadfaculty:

Pallas’s cat is a small wild cat having a broad but patchy distribution in the grasslands and montane steppe of Central Asia. The species is negatively affected by habitat degradation, prey base decline, and hunting, and has therefore been classified as ‘Near Threatened’ by IUCN since 2002.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pallas’s_cat

annie i think you need this

theclearlydope:

So much sex happens here. 

theclearlydope:

So much sex happens here. 


science side of tumblr please explain this. 

science side of tumblr please explain this. 

skunkbear:

Scientists at MIT have developed a new simulation that traces 13 billion years of cosmic evolution. They start the simulation shortly after the big bang with a region of space much smaller than the universe (a mere 350 million light years across).  Still, it’s big enough to follow the forces that helped create the galaxies we see today, and correctly predict the gas and metal content of those galaxies.

At first, we see dark matter clustering due to the force of gravity (first two GIFs). Then we see visible matter — blue for cool clouds of gas where galaxies form, red for more violent explosive galaxies (second two GIFs).

Super massive blackholes form, superheating the material around them, causing bright white explosions that enrich the space between galaxies with warm but sparse gas (fifth GIF).

Different elements (represented by different colors in the sixth GIF) are spread through the universe.

We arrive at a distribution of dark matter that looks similar to the one we see in our universe today (seventh GIF).

The simulation is so complex it would take two thousand years to render on a single desktop. And it’s kinda beautiful.

Image Credit: MIT and Nature Video

"You still don’t understand what you’re dealing with, do you? Perfect organism. Its structural perfection is matched only by its hostility."

Alien (1979)

skunkbear:

WHEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!

I was recently reminded how much I still enjoy this endlessly zooming video from 1968, “Powers of Ten”:

You’ve got to watch the video for the narration and the kickin’ soundtrack. For a modern, interactive take, check out “The Scale of the Universe" by Cary Huang. Get some perspective!